Category Archives: Hand Knitted

A Pink Tie Event

Patons 9887

Yesterday I was going through a parcel of pattern leaflets donated to the Knitting & Crochet Guild collection, when this one caught my eye.  As it would – it is very eye-catching.  The description says “This modern dress with ‘kipper’ tie is right up to the minute!” – the minute in question being 1967, or possibly 1966.  

The dress has some nice features, if you can get yourself into a 1960s mindset – shirt-style collar and cuffs to go with the tie, and the wide point of the tie standing out against the paler pink.  And notice that it’s worn with white tights, which had a moment back then.

It shows the influence of Mary Quant on fashions – here for instance is a pattern of hers issued by Patons in 1966.

Patons 9701

I browsed through other Patons patterns published about the same time, to see of there were other ‘trendy’ designs.  There weren’t many – as always, many of the patterns were for babies and children.  And there were a lot of Aran designs – Aran jumpers were popular in the late 1960s.  And also this was a young fashion – most older women wouldn’t have dreamed of wearing a minidress in 1968.    But I did find a few examples.

Patons 9943

“Twisted rib and lace patterning make this dress a winner.” – I like the three different stitch patterns used in bands so that the fabric gets less dense moving from the hem to the neck.  The plain round neck is another influence from Mary Quant, I think.  (I also think that that hair isn’t all her own…)

Patons 9928

You could also crochet yourself a dress – “This attractive yet easy-to-crochet dress has a lace patterned skirt and a contrasting yoke.”

And you should wear your minidress with a beret.

Patons 9808

I think this one is very nice (although again you’ve got a warm dress with short sleeves).  There is no waist shaping – it’s just done by the change from stocking stitch to a wide rib.  Patons Bracken was a flecked wool, giving the oatmeal-y effect – very attractive.    

And to top off the outfit, you could knit your beret.  To emphasise that this was a young fashion, the pattern says that the largest size is for a girl of up to 16 years, though in fact a beret that fits a 16 year old will also fit an adult.  

 
My sister, who was a fashion-conscious teenager at the time, had a pink angora dress (short, but with long sleeves) and a matching pink beret, both knitted by our mother.  It was very warm and cosy, I’m sure, though it probably shed fibres everywhere.  The dress is long gone, but I think I may still have the beret.   I shall look.
Source: ggg

Anniversary

The first post on this blog appeared on Wednesday 13th January 2010.  Seven years ago.  Isn’t that amazing?  I’m amazed, anyway.  I never expected to be still writing blog posts.  The original idea was just to find out something about blogs and blogging by trying it for myself – I’m sure I didn’t imagine that I would carry on blogging for so long.

In that first post, I showed this photo of a Fair Isle pullover I knitted for John in the early 80s, before I stopped knitting for a long long time. Since 2010, the pullover has had an exciting time – I lent it to Lydia who used to own Spun in Huddersfield (still open, but with a new owner).  She started to sell Jamieson’s Shetland, and wanted some examples of Fair Isle knitting to inspire customers.  I lent her John’s pullover, and a sweater from the same book by Sarah Don that I had knitted for myself, and they were on display in the shop for most of a year.  Lydia said that many customers admired them, and several wanted to buy the pullover.  Now we have them both back at home, I think perhaps we ought to start wearing them again….

Back to my anniversary.  Now that I’ve been writing this blog for seven years, I can see that I have managed to write about 70 posts a year.  It’s been quite consistent – the minimum is 66, the maximum 76.  This is despite my best intentions to write more often.  Must try harder, and I’ll see how I’ve done this time next year.
Source: ggg

Twined Knitting in Sheringham

Last weekend I went to Sheringham youth hostel for a knitting weekend.  As last year, it was organised by the Leighton Buzzard branch of the Knitting & Crochet Guild.  The weather this year was different, though – damp, misty, quite mild, no wind.  Sea and sky were almost indistinguishable.  But a knitting weekend doesn’t need sunshine and we had a very good time.

On the Friday and Saturday evenings, we sat in the lounge and knitted, had excellent dinners provided by the Youth Hostel staff, and did more knitting.  And lots of chatting.

On Saturday morning we went to The Mo, the Sheringham museum, on the sea front.

It is not open to the public in the winter, but we had a special tour behind the scenes.  The museum has recently been extended, thanks to a lottery grant, and we were shown how the new storage areas are being used.  We saw some wonderful ganseys, too – some modern ones that we could handle, and others from the museum’s collection.  One particularly fine gansey dates from the 1950s – the knitting is meticulously neat, with 14 stitches to the inch, I was told.  (Didn’t manage to get a decent photo, I’m afraid.)

 In the afternoon, we had workshops back at the Youth Hostel.  I repeated the twined knitting workshop that I did for the Huddersfield branch of the Guild in December.  (And never got around to writing about – Christmas got in the way.)   I had designed a wristlet to knit in two colours of DK.  (There was also a flat piece, that you could think of as a coaster, for those people who couldn’t manage knitting in the round.)  

I didn’t know anything at all about twined knitting before I found that I had somehow volunteered to lead a workshop for the Huddersfield branch.  It was originally scheduled for April 2016, but postponed due to my argument with a ladder.  So I’ve been practising twined knitting for quite a while.  Looking back, I see that when I knitted a cuff or wristlet in twined knitting in March last year,  I said here that I didn’t want to knit a second one.  But since then, I’ve got more enthusiastic, and I decided that over the weekend I would knit something a bit bigger, just for me.  Over the weekend (including the long train journeys there and back)  I worked on a pair of fingerless mitts.  Not in two colours this time, but using the two ends of one ball of yarn.  I love the effect of two-end knitting and the surface patterns you can make.  The mitts are going to be very warm and cosy.  More when I have finished them.

        

Thank you very much, Brigitte, for organising another really enjoyable weekend.

    
Source: ggg

Introducing Helicoid!

It snowed this weekend in Delaware and once we finished shoveling, we all curled up inside with cocoa to watch football.  Schnapps was extra busy knitting this weekend and he came up with a couple of new patterns.  The first one is Helicoid.  This was a big hit on our Facebook page…….Schnapps hopes you like it too.
Schnapps thinks this might be his new favorite pattern…..there are so many color combinations……next time he is planning on doing the brim in a contrasting color too and using 3 different colors.  This pattern is a great stash buster too.  A bonus?  It’s super simple – just stockinette in alternating colors to make the spirals.  Of course, he included instructions for all yarn weights because we know every stash has different yarn!
This version was knit using Knit Picks Brava bulky, which is a terrific yarn…..soft and cuddly and machine washable with no wool to aggravate anyone’s allergies or delicate skin.  
This version was knit with Lion Brand Hometown USA, another washable, non-wool yarn that we love to use for chemo caps.
 Scrimmage Stitches is now for sale as well!  This e-book is a compilation of 15 hat patterns designed for Delaware Head Huggers. Along with 3 never before published patterns, there are 12 patterns found on the blog, Knitting with Schnapps. Patterns vary in complexity, so there is something for everyone. All patterns include information for knitting them in super-bulky, chunky, worsted and sport weight yarn. 100% of all sales go into supporting Delaware Head Huggers and helping to pay for shipping and supply costs.   The book can be purchased at our Ravelry and Craftsy stores or by using the link on the right hand side of this page.

Scrimmage Stitches patterns!
If you’re not a fan of Delaware Head Huggers yet, stop by and “Like” our Facebook page.  Help us name the patterns and see all the beautiful hats that are donated.  Stop by Kozy Kovers for Kids Facebook page too!  We welcome everyone to join us.  Stop by and say hello.  You can always reach Schnapps or me at robin@delawareheadhuggers.org too!
 
Even though the deck is cleared of snow for him, he manages to find some flakes to stick to his face!

 Helicoid

 You will need 2 colors of 5-weight yarn and size US 10.5 circular needles or some other combination listed below. 

Abbreviations:
k2tog:  knit 2 stitches together

Using Color A, cast on 64 stitches, place marker and join, taking care not to twist stitches.

Work Brim:  Using Color A
Row 1:   knit all stitches
Row 2:    purl all stitches
Repeat Rows 1 & 2 until your work measures 1.5 to  2 inches in length, ending with a Row 1.

Work Body of Hat:   Using Colors A & B
All stitches are knit stitches. 
Row 1:   *2a, 2b*; repeat around
Row 2:   *1a, 2b, 1a*; repeat
Row 3:   *2b, 2a*; repeat around
Row 4:   *1b, 2a, 1b*; repeat around

Repeat Rows 1 -4 until piece is about 6 to 6.5 inches in length. 

Work Crown:  Using Only Color A
Row 1:    knit all stitches
Repeat Row 1 until piece is about 7 inches in length.

Crown Decrease:  use dpn’s when needed
Row 1:   *k6, k2tog *; repeat around
Row 2:   *k5, k2tog*; repeat around
Row 3:   *k4, k2tog *; repeat around
Row 4:   *k3, k2tog*; repeat around
Row 5:   *k2, k2tog *; repeat around
Row 6:   *k1, k2tog*; repeat around
Row 7:   *k2tog*; repeat around

Finish: Cut working yarn, leaving a 6-inch tail.  Draw the tail through the remaining stitches, cinch closed and secure.  Weave in ends and share.

 If using 6-weight yarn, use size 13 needles and cast on 48.

If using 4-weight yarn, use size 7 needles and cast on 88.

If using 3-weight yarn, use size 5 needles and cast on 104 stitches. 

The pattern is worked over 4 stitches,  but the crown decrease is worked over 8 stitches.

Feel free to use a third color and make the brim a contrast to the body.

Experiment and enjoy!




Source: New feed

Introducing Reticulated Hope!

2017 is here and I just know great things will happen!  
We ended 2016 with a grand total of 22,297 chemo caps (3,110 in 2016) and 2,287 blankets for foster children and kids in crisis (272 in 2016).  When Schnapps and I started this back in 2010 we never dreamed that it would grow so much.  Thank you to everyone who helps and to all of you who use our patterns to help your local communities.  We hope that we can all challenge and inspire each other to keep creating comforting, beautiful things to spread some happiness.
Schnapps played around with some 6-weight yarn this weekend during football and came up with this pattern.  Amazing how a different yarn gives the same pattern an entirely different look, isn’t it?  You could do the brim one color and the crown another too.  Remember, be creative and experiment……..worst that happens is you rip out something and start over……..most times you come up with something wonderful!
Very simple and super quick to knit, especially in super bulky yarn, the pattern includes info for other yarn weights as always.  

 Scrimmage Stitches is now for sale as well!  This e-book is a compilation of 15 hat patterns designed for Delaware Head Huggers. Along with 3 never before published patterns, there are 12 patterns found on the blog, Knitting with Schnapps. Patterns vary in complexity, so there is something for everyone. All patterns include information for knitting them in super-bulky, chunky, worsted and sport weight yarn. 100% of all sales go into supporting Delaware Head Huggers and helping to pay for shipping and supply costs.   The book can be purchased at our Ravelry and Craftsy stores or by using the link on the right hand side of this page.

Scrimmage Stitches patterns!
If you’re not a fan of Delaware Head Huggers yet, stop by and “Like” our Facebook page.  Help us name the patterns and see all the beautiful hats that are donated.  Stop by Kozy Kovers for Kids Facebook page too!  We welcome everyone to join us.  Stop by and say hello.  You can always reach Schnapps or me at robin@delawareheadhuggers.org too!
 
Missing the excitement of the holidays…..but ready for some snuggle time!
 
Reticulated Hope

  You will need 6-weight yarn and size US 13 circular needles or some other combination listed below. 
 
Abbreviations:
s1:  slip one stitch
k2tog:  knit 2 stitches together

Cast on 48 stitches, place marker and join, taking care not to twist stitches.

Work Brim:
Rows 1 & 2:   knit all stitches
Row 3:  *s1 knitwise, k1*; repeat around
Row 4:   *s1 purlwise with yarn in back, p1*; repeat around

Repeat Rows 1 – 4  until piece is anywhere from 3 to 6.5 inches in length, depending on what you like best.

Work Crown:
Row 1:   knit all stitches
Repeat Row 1 until the hat is about 7.5 inches in length.


Decrease Crown:  use dpn’s when needed
Row 1:   *k6, k2tog*; repeat around
Row 2:    *k5, k2tog*; repeat around
Row 3:   *k4, k2tog*; repeat around
Row 4:    *k3, k2tog*; repeat around
Row 5:    *k2, k2tog*; repeat around
Row 6:   *k1, k2tog*; repeat around
Row 7:   *k2tog*; repeat around

Finish: Cut working yarn, leaving a 6-inch tail.  Draw the tail through the remaining stitches, cinch closed and secure.  Weave in ends and share.

 
If using 5-weight yarn, use size 10.5 needles and cast on 64. 

If using 4-weight yarn, use size 7 needles and cast on 88. 

If using 3-weight yarn, use size 5 needles and cast on 104 stitches.  

The pattern is worked over 2 stitches, but vary in multiples of 8 to keep the crown decrease the same. 


Source: New feed

Advent Calendars

In November, a group of knitters from the Huddersfield Knitting & Crochet Guild branch decided to share two Opal advent calendars – these calendars have 24 doors for the days of Advent, like other Advent calendars, but behind each door is a 15g. ball of Opal sock yarn.  There were 8 members of the calendar syndicate and 48 balls of wool, so 6 balls each – sounds simple, doesn’t it?  No.  They devised an extremely complicated scheme – before any of the doors were opened, the ball behind each door was pre-allocated to a syndicate member.  Then each member had custody of one of the calendars for 6 days.  Every day she opened the appropriate door and posted a photo of the ball door could see what she was getting.  Here’s one of the photos, posted by Ann Kingstone.

 And after six days, the keeper of the cube met the next keeper, to hand it over.

Yesterday was the grand finale, when the syndicate met to distribute the balls of wool to their owners. I wasn’t a member of the syndicate, just a fascinated observer, but I went along to see how it all worked out.  They met in Salt’s Diner in Salts Mill in Saltaire, the other side of Bradford.

Every member of the syndicate was given a pair of socks with their balls of wool stuffed inside.  Then there some exchanging, so that people could get a selection of colours that they liked.  There was even some discussion of what they might knit with the yarn – the 6 balls will make a pair of (very multi-coloured) socks, though you could mix them with a plain background colour and make something bigger like a shawl.  And as far as I could see, everyone was happy with their share, and keen to do it all again next year.      

By then it was dark, and we went into the village to see the Saltaire Advent windows, which are lit up every evening until January 5th.  Like any other Advent calendar, a new window was ‘opened’ every day in December until Christmas Eve, though they started with 10 windows on December 1st, so now there are 33 windows to see.   The windows are scattered all over the village, and I didn’t have time to see many of them, but I did see some very well-designed and executed displays.  And the very first that we found was this:

   
It’s all knitted or crocheted – poinsettias in pots, snowmen, paper chains, a gingerbread house,…

Knitted robins wearing woolly hats on a knitted snow-covered log:

Alpacas wearing woolly scarves (both crocheted, I think) under knitted mistletoe:

 (Alpacas are important in the history of Saltaire because Titus Salt, who built the village for his mill workers, made his money out of spinning alpaca yarn.)

So window no. 7 was a very good start for a party of knitters.  

Another favourite:  window 19, showing Father Christmas in his sleigh flying over the village.

And here’s window 9, a display about Titus Salt’s rules for the people living in Saltaire:

No pubs; No drinking alcohol; No hanging out washing; No animals in Saltaire.

You can read more about the rules here.  As far as I remember from a guided walk around Saltaire, the prohibition on hanging out washing was because Salt had provided a wash-house and he wanted the villagers to pay to do their washing there, but it wasn’t popular.  Some villagers got around the rule by hanging out their washing on vacant land just outside the village.  And he wasn’t against alcohol as such – the rules was really against being drunk, and he didn’t want pubs where workers might meet and combine against him.  Philanthropic, but only up to a point.

The windows were worth seeing.  The Saltaire Living Calendar has been happening every Christmas since 2006, though I had not heard of it before this year – I’ll go again next year, with enough time to see them all.    
Source: ggg

Introducing Pilasters!

Schnapps wanted to be sure to share one last pattern for 2016 with everyone.  It’s hard to believe that there are only a few more days until we ring in 2017.  The years seem to go by more quickly all the time.   We hope you all had a wonderful holiday season and we wish for nothing but great things for you in 2017!
Schnapps and I were disappointed this month……Lion Brand Yarn had contacted us in August and told us that they were doing a huge “Yarn Heroes Campaign” and they wanted to feature us in part of it.  Apparently, a person who worked for Lion Brand had been following this blog and had seen all the patterns that Schnapps shares.  They said that they were supporting several charity crafters and were looking to be partners by donating yarn on a regular basis and showcasing our work.  There followed months of answering questions and giving information……then a box of yarn was delivered to help us create more hats…….it was suggested that Schnapps get a “yarn hero” cape…..and then nothing happened. 
I like my cape!
I’m a Yarn Hero, no matter what!
It turns out that Lion Brand changed their minds and massively scaled back the Yarn Hero Campaign, leaving it with just professional bloggers sharing a pattern that can be used for charity crafting.  All the actual charity crafters were not going to be featured and the promise of yarn for the foreseeable future changed to a statement that we should submit an application if we want free yarn.  The original person who contacted us is no longer at Lion Brand.  It’s disappointing for us to realize how close a major company was to really making a large difference in the charity crafting world, but not really surprising.  There are so many of you who do so much…………but we do it to help others, not for recognition from companies.  
So, Schnapps is busy using the yarn that was originally sent and we are back to purchasing yarn when it’s on sale to keep our charity work going.  Pilasters is his latest pattern and it’s super simple and fast to knit. 
 Scrimmage Stitches is now for sale as well!  This e-book is a compilation of 15 hat patterns designed for Delaware Head Huggers. Along with 3 never before published patterns, there are 12 patterns found on the blog, Knitting with Schnapps. Patterns vary in complexity, so there is something for everyone. All patterns include information for knitting them in super-bulky, chunky, worsted and sport weight yarn. 100% of all sales go into supporting Delaware Head Huggers and helping to pay for shipping and supply costs.   The book can be purchased at our Ravelry and Craftsy stores or by using the link on the right hand side of this page.

Scrimmage Stitches patterns!
If you’re not a fan of Delaware Head Huggers yet, stop by and “Like” our Facebook page.  Help us name the patterns and see all the beautiful hats that are donated.  Stop by Kozy Kovers for Kids Facebook page too!  We welcome everyone to join us.  Stop by and say hello.  You can always reach Schnapps or me at robin@delawareheadhuggers.org too!
 

  You can see where our hats go by visiting our website:  www.delawareheadhuggers.org

 Pilasters

You will need 6-weight yarn and size US 13 circular needles or some other combination listed below. 
Abbreviations:
k2tog:  knit 2 stitches together

Cast on 48 stitches, place marker and join, taking care not to twist stitches.

Work Brim:
You are going to purl 3 stitches together, then without dropping them, knit the same 3 stitches together and purl the same 3 stitches together again.  After the second p3tog, you drop the stitches from the LH needle.

Row 1:  * (p3tog, k3tog, p3tog) in the same 3 stitches, k1*
Row 2:   knit all stitches
Repeat Rows 1 – 2  until piece is about 4.5 to 5 inches in length.  Feel free to adapt the length as you like, making it longer or shorter.
Work Hat:
Row 1:   knit all stitches
Repeat Row 1 until the hat is about 7.5 inches in length.

Decrease Crown:  use dpn’s when needed

Row 1:   *k2, k2tog*; repeat around
Row 2:    *k1, k2tog*; repeat around
Row 3:   *k2tog*; repeat around
Row 4:   *k2tog*; repeat around
Repeat Row 4 if desired if you use a thinner yarn.

Finish: Cut working yarn, leaving a 6-inch tail.  Draw the tail through the remaining stitches, cinch closed and secure.  Weave in ends and share.


If using 5-weight yarn, use size 10.5 needles and cast on 64. 

If using 4-weight yarn, use size 7 needles and cast on 80. 

If using 3-weight yarn, use size 5 needles and cast on 100 stitches.  

The pattern is worked over 4 stitches. 

Source: New feed

Christmas 1941

Stitchcraft, December 1941

75 years ago, Britain had been at war for more than two years, and on the home front, life was difficult.  Food and clothes were rationed, so Christmas could have been cheerless and miserable. But magazines like Stitchcraft tried to show readers how to make the best of things. The December 1941 Stitchcraft  had a bright and stylish jumper on the cover – it took just 12 oz. (340g.) of 4-ply (fingering) wool, and 1 oz. of contrast.  The magazine also offered a pattern for a sleeveless V-neck pullover for “one of your friends in the Forces”, as well as two more knitting patterns for women — another jumper and a cardigan.

An ad in the magazine illustrates the advantage of knitting your own clothes.  Greenwoods of Huddersfield would supply the wool to knit any of the patterns in the magazine, or would knit them for you.  The wool to knit the cover jumper cost 9/5½ (9 shillings and five pence ha’penny – about 47½p, directly translated into decimal coinage).  But as well as the money, you had to send in 6 of your clothing coupons.  Alternatively, they would supply it “completely hand-knit and ready to wear” for 25 shillings (£1.25) and 8 coupons.  So if you knitted the jumper yourself, you saved a lot of money, and 2 clothing coupons. As the war went on (and after the war too), clothes rationing became more severe, with fewer coupons issued to each person.  Knitting for yourself and your family was essential, to eke out the precious clothing coupons.  

Stitchcraft at that time had a cookery article in each issue, and in December 1941 it was of course about Christmas cookery – or how to cope with limited supplies of everything you might have thought essential.  There’s a recipe for an Excellent Wartime Cake, with no eggs, and a Holiday Pudding, described as “a war-time substitute for our usual Christmas pudding – not the rich, fruit-laden affair of former days, but quite a good one, and far more digestible!”   Both the cake and the pudding contain raisins – it seems surprising that they were still available at all, as they were imported, but clearly supplies were much more limited than before the war.

Christmas present giving was not forgotten either – several pages of the magazine are devoted to ideas for gifts, largely made from oddments of wool and scraps of fabric.  There are needle cases, pin-cushions like cacti in pots, a soft toy fox terrier, and an egg cosy “for the monthly egg”.   To be honest, these knick-knacks mostly do look like something made out of oddments, though the gloves and scarves would be very acceptable.  And the jumper, cardigan and pullover patterns are appealing, even today.  Overall, the magazine did a very good job of encouraging Christmas cheer.

A merry Christmas to us all.
Source: ggg

Bonham Mitts

I have just finished the Bonham mitts that I was knitting at the Knitting & Stitching Show in Harrogate at the end of last month.  They are a Christmas present for my daughter, so I’ve timed it well.  Not a surprise present – she chose the colours and tried on the first mitt during the knitting so that I could get the length right.

The yarn is Rowan Donegal Lambswool Tweed, discontinued long ago.  I was given several skeins in different colours a few years ago, and it has been languishing in my stash ever since.  I thought it would be right for these mitts, because the recommended yarn is Rowan Fine Tweed (also now discontinued). The Donegal Lambswool is a similar weight.  The colours are called Blue Mist and Pickle.  Blue Mist is fairly straightforward, but pickles come in all sorts of colours. But the yarn is the colour of Branston pickle, so perhaps that is what the name refers to.

The mitt design is by Angharad Thomas, and based on a pair of gloves dated 1818 that were sold by Bonhams the auctioneers a year or two ago.  (You can see the original gloves on Angharad’s blog, here.)  It’s an interesting construction too – all the increases for the thumb gusset are on one side, not on both sides as is usually done.  So the thumb on the second mitt has to be a mirror image of the first.  And on one side of the thumb gusset, the rows of stitches are in the same direction as those on the palm:

   
and on the other side, where all the increases are, the rows of stitches are at an angle to the palm:

It’s an intriguing effect.

I’m very pleased with the finished mitts.  They are wrapped up and under the Christmas tree, and I’m sure Susie will like them too.

Source: ggg

A Long, Long Scarf A-Winding

I have been knitting a scarf for my sister for quite a while now – I wrote in August about knitting a swatch for it, here.  It’s been my main knitting project ever since, though I’ve been doing other bits of knitting, too (as well as everything else that needs doing apart from knitting).   It took a long time because of Margaret’s specification – she wanted it to be 80 inches long and 10 inches wide (about 200 × 25 cm.)  And it is.

I could have made it a bit longer, because I had 20g. of yarn left, out of the original 200g.  But we had arranged to meet last Monday, so I had to stop knitting and press it before then.  Otherwise, I would have finished off the yarn – I think 80 inches was intended as a minimum, not a maximum, and I don’t have an obvious use for 20g. of 4-ply yarn.

It wasn’t a surprise present.  Margaret approved the colour before I bought the yarn, and I sent her the swatch so that she could check that it wouldn’t be irritating (it’s alpaca and nylon, because she can’t wear wool).  So on Monday she tried it for size and declared it long enough, before re-wrapping it to put away until Christmas Day.

It is all knitted in dewdrop stitch, from Barbara Walker’s Treasury of Knitting Patterns – an easy lace pattern.  Three out of four rows are just k3, p3 all across the row, and the complications that make it lacy are all on the 4th row.

The wrong side looks just as good as the right side, too, though they aren’t the same.  In the photo below, the wrong side is shown on the right.

A very successful project – it will be wonderfully warm and cosy to wear.  And not itchy.
Source: ggg